Recent Storm Damage Posts

THE CALM BEFORE THE STORM: PREPARING YOUR ROOF AGAINST HAILSTORMS

3/19/2021 (Permalink)

While the Spring season in Texas equals great temperature and fun outdoorsy activities, consider yourself warned. March begins the yearly hail season—ice as big as golf balls wreak havoc by causing leaky roofs, dented siding, and accidents if you’re caught outside during a storm.

NOAA’s Severe Storms database records over 5,396 major hail storms by last year, 2019. According to the U.S. Department of Commerce, Storm Prediction Center, National Weather Service, Texas ranks first at the Top Five States By Number Of Major Hail Events. For hail-prone areas, it’s best to be ready for any circumstances that could happen.

Once the storm starts, there is pretty much nothing you can do except to stay inside. It’s safer to double-check everything beforehand, including the things that you can minimize damage to. Safe-proof your home before hail season starts and take precautions that could help lessen the damages.

For everyone’s safety, stay indoors. Pay attention to weather reports to be prepared and shop for groceries, flashlights, and batteries. Close your doors and windows and stay away because of the risks of flying glass.

GUTTER CHECK!

Drains and gutters could easily be filled by fallen leaves, debris from trees, and hailstones. They stop water flow due to clogging and cause damage due to the lack of proper drainage. As a solution, drain these areas. Keep your gutters free from debris that could cause water to back up and potentially cause leaks in the future. This is to ensure that water could drain normally.

MAINTAIN YOUR LAWN.

Amid a really bad hail storm, branches and plants can pose a threat to your home. Tree branches could hit your windows and shutter glass. For safety reasons, trim tree and shrub branches that could potentially cause extensive damage to your property. Maintaining your lawn helps eliminate the risks of the upcoming storm.

TAKE YOUR STUFF INDOORS.

Branches and shrubs aren’t the only things that pose a threat to your windows. If possible, take your outdoor furniture and decoration indoors to avoid them becoming hailstone targets and projectiles.

A HAND IN REPAIRS: YOUR INSURANCE POLICY.

After the storm and the damage has been done, check in with your insurance company before authorizing repair work needed. Document the damages and call the company as soon as possible.

INSPECT YOUR ROOF (DO IT PERSONALLY, OR GET A SECOND OPINION).

Before anything else, contacting a professional roofing company to inspect your roof and prepare you against the future dangers of the storm might be better.

Your roof protects you against heavy rain and the scorching sun. It also protects you against hailstones. As it is everyone’s first line of defense against the hail season, repairs are a must. Make sure to inspect your roof regularly. Check for loose or missing shingles and have them repaired as soon as possible to prevent future problems. Loose shingles could cause possible leaking due to the upcoming hail season. If there are small dents in the area, have them inspected. Or consider improving your current option to a material that’s much more resistant.

SERVPRO Tips for Hurricane Season

2/4/2021 (Permalink)

Hurricane season has taken a toll on places like North Carolina and Florida. Businesses and homeowners everywhere should consider many things during hurricane season to prevent damage to their property. Many of them seem obvious, but others, not so much. What are some of these preparation tasks you might ask? Let us try to answer this question.

Building and Street Maintenance

Consider the last time you cleaned your storm drains. If they have not been cleared out in recent years, this could cause a blockage of water from draining away from your property. When water gets clogged in drains, this can lead to a back-up. This means water will be coming back into your home or business and can cause very serious damage. If you have a shop vac (dry/wet vacuum), try to get some of the dirt and build up out of the drain. If you can’t clean it properly, call a professional.

Sump Pumps

Sump pumps are basically pumps used to get rid of water that has entered a building. When turned on, these pumps run water through a hose and outside of the property. If you own these pumps when was the last time they were tested? Do they have a battery backup in case of a power outage? Power outages cause almost 20 percent of water damage due to sump pumps not being able to run during these outages. If you do not own a sump pump, consider buying one especially if you commonly see water damage on site.

Generator Fuel Tanks

Many people like to store back up generators in their basements. This can be dangerous because if water seeps into your basement and gets into the fuel tanks, this will contaminate the gas and lead to failure to start the generator. In turn, this means no power and could lead to more damage.

Runoff

Does grading lead away from your building? Grading helps to move water away from your building instead of moving towards it. Checking your grading system can help keep water from flowing into your building.

Clear the Floor

One of the leading causes of water damage is the items on the floor. You can avoid this by removing porous materials, boxes, and paper from the floor of your basement. Keep all of your electronics off the floor and make sure to turn off your electronics when you are expecting heavy rains.

The Best Way To Minimize a Disaster at Your Home or Business is to Plan For it NOW!

2/4/2021 (Permalink)

As many as 50% of businesses may never recover following a disaster, according to the latest industry research. Of the businesses that survive, the overwhelming majority of them had a preparedness plan in place. Pre-planning can serve as an insurance policy aimed at peace of mind. By developing a SERVPRO® Emergency READY Profile for your business, you minimize business interruption by having an immediate plan of action. Knowing what to do and what to expect in advance is the key to timely mitigation and can help minimize how water and fire damage can affect your business.

Are You Ready? Preparation is a key component for making it through any size disaster, whether it’s a small water leak, a large fire, or an area flood. The best time for planning for such events is not when the event happens, but well before it happens. No one ever plans on a disaster, but you can plan for it. Now is the time to ask yourself, “Are you ready for whatever could happen?” The SERVPRO® Emergency READY Profile is a startup approach that provides the critical information needed to begin mitigation and recovery services. It is designed to serve as a quick reference for important building and contact information. By working with SERVPRO’s Emergency READY Profile, your business will receive the benefit of over 40 years of experience in reducing the impact of any natural or man-made disaster. SERVPRO® is a leader in water and fire damage response and can help you quickly get your property back in working order.

  • A no-cost assessment of your facility.
    This means there is no need to allocate funds, giving you a great value at no cost.
     
  • A concise Profile Document that contains only the critical information needed in the event of an emergency.
    It will only take a little time to complete and will not take you away from current projects. But it will save a lot of time if ever needed.
     
  • A guide to help you get back into your building following a disaster.
    This can help minimize the amount of time your business is inactive by having an immediate plan of action.
     
  • Establishes your local SERVPRO Franchise Professional as your disaster mitigation and restoration provider.
    You have a provider that is recognized as an industry leader and close by.
     
  • Identification of the line of command for authorizing work to begin.
    This saves time so we can begin the work of mitigating the damage which can save you time and money.
     
  • Provides facility details such as shut-off valve locations, priority areas, and priority contact information.
    Having a quick reference for what to do, how to do it, and who to call provides solutions in advance of an emergency so that during the emergency you are "Ready for whatever happens."

When Storms hit King of Prussia, SERVPRO is ready!

2/2/2021 (Permalink)

SERVPRO of King of Prussia specializes in storm and flood damage restoration.  Our crews are highly trained and we use specialized equipment to restore your property to its pre-storm condition.

Faster Response

Since we are locally owned and operated, we are able to respond quicker with the right resources, which is extremely important. A fast response lessens the damage, limits further damage, and reduces the restoration cost.

Resources to Handle Floods and Storms

When storms hit, we can scale our resources to handle a large storm or flooding disaster. We can access equipment and personnel from a network of 1,650 Franchises across the country and elite Disaster Recovery Teams that are strategically located throughout the United States.

Have Storm or Flood Damage? Call Us Today 610-337-3330

Winter Weather Tips

2/1/2021 (Permalink)

Snowstorms & Extreme Cold

Winter storms create a higher risk of car accidents, hypothermia, frostbite, carbon monoxide poisoning, and heart attacks from overexertion. Winter storms and blizzards can bring extreme cold, freezing rain, snow, ice, and high winds. A winter storm can:

  • Last a few hours or several days;
  • Knock out heat, power, and communication services; and
  • Place older adults, young children, and sick individuals at greater risk.

IF YOU ARE UNDER A WINTER STORM WARNING, FIND SHELTER RIGHT AWAY

  • Stay off roads.
  • Stay indoors and dress warmly.
  • Prepare for power outages.
  • Use generators outside only and away from windows.
  • Listen for emergency information and alerts.
  • Look for signs of hypothermia and frostbite.
  • Check on neighbors.

HOW TO STAY SAFE WHEN A WINTER STORM THREATENS:

Prepare NOW

  • Know your area’s risk for winter storms. Extreme winter weather can leave communities without utilities or other services for long periods of time.
  • Prepare your home to keep out the cold with insulation, caulking, and weather stripping. Learn how to keep pipes from freezing. Install and test smoke alarms and carbon monoxide detectors with battery backups.
  • Pay attention to weather reports and warnings of freezing weather and winter storms. Sign up for your community’s warning system. The Emergency Alert System (EAS) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Weather Radio also provide emergency alerts.
  • Gather supplies in case you need to stay home for several days without power. Keep in mind each person’s specific needs, including medication. Do not forget the needs of pets. Have extra batteries for radios and flashlights.
  • Create an emergency supply kit for your car. Include jumper cables, sand, a flashlight, warm clothes, blankets, bottled water, and non-perishable snacks. Keep the gas tank full.
  • Learn the signs of, and basic treatments for, frostbite and hypothermia.

Survive DURING

  • Stay off roads if at all possible. If trapped in your car, then stay inside.
  • Limit your time outside. If you need to go outside, then wear layers of warm clothing. Watch for signs of frostbite and hypothermia.
  • Avoid carbon monoxide poisoning. Only use generators and grills outdoors and away from windows. Never heat your home with a gas stovetop or oven.
  • Reduce the risk of a heart attack. Avoid overexertion when shoveling snow.
  • Watch for signs of frostbite and hypothermia and begin treatment right away.
  • Check on neighbors. Older adults and young children are more at risk in extreme cold.

RECOGNIZE AND RESPOND

  • Frostbite causes loss of feeling and color around the face, fingers, and toes.
    • Signs: Numbness, white or grayish-yellow skin, firm or waxy skin
    • Actions: Go to a warm room. Soak in warm water. Use body heat to warm. Do not massage or use a heating pad.
  • Hypothermia is an unusually low body temperature. A temperature below 95 degrees is an emergency.
    • Signs: Shivering, exhaustion, confusion, fumbling hands, memory loss, slurred speech, or drowsiness
    • Actions: Go to a warm room. Warm the center of the body first—chest, neck, head, and groin. Keep dry and wrapped up in warm blankets, including the head and neck.

Steps to Take Immediately After a Storm Damage

1/18/2021 (Permalink)

Storm damage can occur at any time and can cause an immense amount of harm to your home. Heavy rains can cause flooding and powerful winds can cause roof damage and downed trees on your property. Some post-storm damage can create safety and health hazards as well, so having a strategy to deal with damage will help you to be ready to take steps immediately after the storm.

Take Safety Precautions

Heavy winds and rain can create physical hazards such as collapsed roofing materials, window damage, collapsed walls, or standing water in the basement or home interior. In addition, moisture can soak into furniture, carpeting, and building materials making the perfect environment for mold growth that can cause health effects. Shut off the main gas line if you smell gas. Beware of broken glass, exposed nails, and other sharp objects on the property. Contact a reputable property restoration company to help do basic tasks to secure your property and make it safe to use. If necessary, arrange for an alternative place for you and your family to live while your property is being restored to safe living conditions.

Photograph the Damage

If it is safe to move around your property, use your cellphone or a camera to photograph the damage so that you will have a record for your insurance company. This action will ensure that you are fully compensated.

Contact Your Insurance Company

Contact your insurance agent to notify them about the damage to your home immediately. The company will send out an adjuster to determine the extent of the damage so that payment for repairs can be made.

Storm Damage Unnoticed For Several Months

3/19/2020 (Permalink)

Rain can be unpredictable enough, but when storm damage is involved it can make matters even more complicated. In fact, a local office building experienced just that. Through the holiday season, they were closed for business and did not discover the damage from the rain until the office manager returned two days later.

When she and the rest of the staff saw that every inch of the carpet was soaked and files in cardboard boxes have been saturated, they began to panic. When we arrived on the scene, we let them know everything was going to be okay. Our production team began to extract water immediately from the wet carpet while the production manager measured what areas were wet and which were dry in the corners. After thoroughly checking for moisture, extracting all water and drying for a few days, we were able to save the carpet, saving the office and property manager hundreds of dollars.

If you have water damage due to a recent storm, let our office help! Give us a call at 215-877-6653 to schedule an inspection today. Our team is standing by and would be happy to help. 

Snow Blower Safety Tips

2/10/2020 (Permalink)

During this time of season snow blowers are popular, but it's safety is a big deal if you are not careful. 

If you are using a snow blower, you should watch out for items on your property that can jam up the snow blower. Some common items are doormats and pet toys. 

When you are running a snow blower be sure you are not wearing any loose clothing. It's important to always wear tight clothing to prevent any accidents.

Most importantly never put your hand in the front end of the snow blower to remove items. That rule still applies when the machine is not moving, because there is tension on the belt. You can remove items by using a stick or a broom.

Owner of Kirkwood Ace Hardware, Jeff Hinz, says it's better to be safe than sorry.

"We see a lot of people with snow blower injuries and it's generally fingers and digits from the front. If you check any type of medical site you will see that snow blowers are a major cause of injury during the winter. Always stay behind the machine, wear shoes with a good grip so you don't slip and fall," Hinz said.

These are just a few tips to make your experience with a snow blower a good one. 

Tips provided by myndnow.com

Do's And Do Not's of Storm Emergencies

2/10/2020 (Permalink)

Heavy thunderstorms are known to cause flooding both inside and outside of the house. Here are a few tips of what to do if your house has flooded during this storm season.



What To Do After Flooding

  • Wipe excess water from wood furniture after removal of lamps and tabletop items.
  • Remove excess water by mopping and blotting.
  • Place aluminum foil or wood blocks between furniture legs and wet carpeting.
  • Remove and prop wet upholstery and cushions.
  • Turn on the air conditioning for maximum drying during the summer months.
  • Remove art objects to a safe, dry place and remove colored rugs from wet carpeting.
  • Gather loose items from the floor.

What NOT To Do After Flooding

  • Do not leave books, magazines or other colored items on wet carpet or floors.
  • Don’t leave wet fabrics in place. Hang furs and leather goods.
  • Don’t use your household vacuum to remove the water.
  • Do not turn on ceiling fixtures if the ceiling is wet and avoid being in rooms where the ceilings are sagging.
  • Do not use the your television or other household appliances.

Content by: SERVPRO Corporate

Storm Damage Could Happen at Any Time

2/7/2020 (Permalink)

What is ChaserCon? 

More than 200 storm chasers have been attending this conference every year since 1998. It was held in Oklahoma City one year, and it was in Wichita in 2019, but every other year it's been held in Denver.

"We have it in January to re-energize chasers out who are usually dealing with storm deprivation syndrome by that time," Roger Hill said.

Roger created ChaserCon at his house in Bennett 22 years ago with another local Colorado chaser named Tim Samaras. Hill said he didn't really know Samaras too well until they started doing ChaserCon together. They grew to become close friends.

“Storm chasing is like a brotherhood,” Roger Hill said. 

ChaserCon became their tradition, and something that other storm chasers looked forward to as winter weather winds down and heads toward the spring.

The ChaserCon tradition almost came to an end in 2013 when Samara was killed while launching a research probe into the El Reno tornado in Oklahoma.

“Caryn and I both knew that Tim would want ChaserCon to continue,” Roger Hill said.

So they’ve kept it going for several more years, but this Saturday they will tell the chaser community that they're closing the doors on ChaserCon for good.

“It’s really going to be hard to do it with a dry eye, it really will," Roger Hill said. 

He said that organizing ChaserCon had become a full-time job for him and Caryn, who want to spend more time traveling the country together outside of storm season. 

They also say they had taken a financial loss on the conference a few years. 

The Hills own the trademark on the name ChaserCon and say they don't want anyone to take the reins and continue the tradition, but they said they would be thrilled to see someone start a similar event in the future. 

There are only a limited amount of spots left in this final ChaserCon. You can try to register for one of those positions until midnight Wednesday, or show up at the Doubletree Hotel in Stapleton North at 7 a.m. Saturday to try to get in as a walk-in. 

He says, "When I first moved here, the problem wasn't here, and it's just gotten worse."

Rainfall is supposed to flow through storm pipes, but Watson says it moves directly into his yard and driveway. He says, "It's a mess. I mean, when we have a good rain, we've got to get wet feet to get in our vehicles if we're going somewhere."

Water runs from the street, down his driveway, and pools up around his house. Clumps of debris clog various drains around Watson's home, and a tree stump blocks a storm pipe.

For several years, Watson says he asked for help from Macon-Bibb County Public Works to clear the storm drains. He says he asks, "About every six months. They know me."

Macon-Bibb Spokesperson Chris Floore says Interim Public Works Director Tim Wilder came to look at the storm drains at Watson's property. 

He says Watson put in about five service requests over the years. Floore says it's not uncommon that drains get clogged up over time, but the tree stump is a problem.

Watson feels his home is getting damaged, and possibly on its way to seeing long-term effects.  

"There's a crack starting right here. It hasn't made it all the way, but how much longer is the water going to tear up my house," says Watson.

Floore says Public Works will remove the tree stump.

Storms Roll Across Texas

2/6/2020 (Permalink)

KILGORE, Texas (KLTV) - Damage is still being assessed from the Friday night storms that rumbled through East Texas, and among those doing that assessment are members of the National Weather Service out of Shreveport.

The priority is to find out what the specific conditions were that caused the damage.

Evaluating every snapped tree and every foot of damage to homes and property is the time-consuming job of NWS investigators.

“Most important is to have good radar data and see where the circulations are. Go along roads and make a note of where we see the damage and then when you see that from a birds-eye view geo-spatially and it lines up, it becomes much more obvious it’s tornado circulation,” says NWS surveyor Brad Bryant.

In the small community of Williams Valley, they track the storm’s path and look at trees, which can be indicators whether it was straight line or tornado rotation.

“Usually if it’s leaning easterly or northeasterly all in one direction , that’s more a sign of straight-line winds. But leaning against each other, against the direction, that’s more an indicator of a tornado. When you get a weak tornado that’s moving quickly it kind of can look like straight line winds,” Bryant says.

But the effort by homeowners to clean up afterward can create a small problem.

Winter Storm to Hit Much of the U.S.

2/3/2020 (Permalink)

At a Glance

  • A winter storm will bring snow and strong winds to the West on Monday.
  • Snow and ice will blanket parts of the Plains, Midwest and Northeast through late this week, but details are still uncertain.
  • Travel could be impacted in many areas because of snow, ice and rain.
  • This storm might not exit the U.S. East Coast until Friday night.

A winter storm will slow down travel across the country this week as it brings snow, ice and rain to parts of the West, Plains, Midwest and Northeast.

This system has been named Winter Storm Kade by The Weather Channel.

 Much of the snow and strong winds from this storm will be in the West and the adjacent Front Range of the Rockies through Monday night. The snow, ice and rain will then affect areas from the Southern Plains to the Midwest and Northeast in multiple phases from Tuesday through Friday. Severe thunderstorms are possible in the warmer air ahead of this system in parts of the South.

Here's a look at where the storm is now and what to expect the next several days. Keep in mind, this forecast will likely change in the coming days, so check back to weather.com for updates.

Happening Now

Snow is currently moving from parts of the Rockies to western South Dakota. Travel conditions will be difficult in many areas, including Salt Lake City.

Salt Lake City International Airport had picked up 5 inches of snow from this storm as of 5 a.m. local time on Monday morning.

There have been several interstate closures because of the snowfall in the Northern Rockies. Go to the link below for more details.

Winter storm warnings and winter weather advisories have been issued by the National Weather Service for parts of the northern and central Rockies and Central Plains.

Cities under a winter storm warning include Salt Lake City and Cheyenne, Wyoming. The city of Denver is currently under a winter weather advisory, but the western suburbs, including Boulder, Colorado, are under a winter storm warning.

The winter storm warning areas are expected to have the heaviest snowfall and greatest travel impacts from this storm system, while lighter snow amounts still capable of causing some travel impacts are expected in the winter weather advisory areas.

Winter storm watches have also now been issued in the Southern Plains from northwest Texas into central Oklahoma for later Tuesday into Wednesday. The watches include Oklahoma City and Lubbock, Texas.

From theweatherchannel.com

Super Bowl Could Get Rained On

1/31/2020 (Permalink)

With festivities kicking off for Sunday's Super Bowl, severe storms may dampen plans Friday into Saturday morning.

Fans arriving in Miami late Friday for the game between the San Francisco 49ers and Kansas City Chiefs may be a little disappointed in the weather, with a 50% chance of drizzle Friday afternoon. The rain is expected to strengthen overnight as a cold front moves through the Miami area.  

2020 is the Last Year For Chaser Con

1/31/2020 (Permalink)

DENVER — Thunderstorms are huge. Sometimes they can be seen from more than 100 miles away, but most storm chasers are interested in seeing what happens near the updraft base. 

That is the part of the storm that has incredible structure to the clouds, and it is also where funnels and tornadoes are most likely to happen. To see that part of the storm, you have to get close. 

And that's the basis for storm chasing. 

A storm chaser is a person who recognizes and admires the beauty in severe weather, which some consider to be dark and ominous. They love it so much, they will seek these storms out as much as they can.

“I think it’s just a natural curiosity," veteran storm chaser Roger Hill said. 

He and his wife -- who is also a storm chaser -- organize a convention in Denver every year called ChaserCon. It started in 1998 because of their passion for storms, and now in its final year, the couple wants storm chasers to get back to their roots. 

What is ChaserCon? 

More than 200 storm chasers have been attending this conference every year since 1998. It was held in Oklahoma City one year, and it was in Wichita in 2019, but every other year it's been held in Denver.

"We have it in January to re-energize chasers out who are usually dealing with storm deprivation syndrome by that time," Roger Hill said.

Roger created ChaserCon at his house in Bennett 22 years ago with another local Colorado chaser named Tim Samaras. Hill said he didn't really know Samaras too well until they started doing ChaserCon together. They grew to become close friends.

“Storm chasing is like a brotherhood,” Roger Hill said. 

ChaserCon became their tradition, and something that other storm chasers looked forward to as winter weather winds down and heads toward the spring.

The ChaserCon tradition almost came to an end in 2013 when Samara was killed while launching a research probe into the El Reno tornado in Oklahoma.

“Caryn and I both knew that Tim would want ChaserCon to continue,” Roger Hill said.

So they’ve kept it going for several more years, but this Saturday they will tell the chaser community that they're closing the doors on ChaserCon for good.

“It’s really going to be hard to do it with a dry eye, it really will," Roger Hill said. 

He said that organizing ChaserCon had become a full-time job for him and Caryn, who want to spend more time traveling the country together outside of storm season. 

They also say they had taken a financial loss on the conference a few years. 

The Hills own the trademark on the name ChaserCon and say they don't want anyone to take the reins and continue the tradition, but they said they would be thrilled to see someone start a similar event in the future. 

There are only a limited amount of spots left in this final ChaserCon. You can try to register for one of those positions until midnight Wednesday, or show up at the Doubletree Hotel in Stapleton North at 7 a.m. Saturday to try to get in as a walk-in. 

From: Channel 9 NBC